Please refresh your browser and scroll down to view our articles and photos. Thank you for your visit.
Lake Hawea, New Zealand



Dengue Outbreak in the Caribbean


On February 21, 2019, the National Travel Health Network and Centre (NaTHNaC) issued the following report.

    As of 17 January 2019 and following a recent report of increased cases of dengue in Jamaica in January 2019 [1], the Caribbean Public Health Agency (CARPHA) has advised that there is a possibility of an outbreak of dengue in the Caribbean region [2]. The last major regional outbreak occurred in 2009 [1]. Countries in the region have been advised to increase their disease surveillance measures. Residents and travellers are advised to take measures to reduce mosquito breeding sites and follow mosquito bite prevention advice.
    Dengue is a viral infection transmitted through the bite of an infected Aedes mosquito. Although most patients with dengue will recover spontaneously, a small number will develop more severe life-threatening forms of the disease. Dengue is common in the tropics including the Caribbean, South and Central America, Africa, SE Asia, the Indian sub-continent and the Pacific Islands.
    Advice for travellers
    Individuals travelling to the affected regions can reduce their risk of acquiring dengue by taking precautions to minimise mosquito bites. Particular vigilance with insect bite precautions should be taken around dawn and dusk, when the mosquitoes that transmit dengue are most active. There is no vaccine to prevent dengue available for travellers.
CDC recommends:

You should be up to date on routine vaccinations while traveling to any destination. Some vaccines may also be required for travel. These vaccines include measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine, diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis vaccine, varicella (chickenpox) vaccine, polio vaccine, and your yearly flu shot.

Hepatitis A -- CDC recommends this vaccine because you can get hepatitis A through contaminated food or water in Jamaica, regardless of where you are eating or staying.

Typhoid -- You can get typhoid through contaminated food or water in Jamaica. CDC recommends this vaccine for most travelers, especially if you are staying with friends or relatives, visiting smaller cities or rural areas, or if you are an adventurous eater.

Hepatitis B -- You can get hepatitis B through sexual contact, contaminated needles, and blood products, so CDC recommends this vaccine if you might have sex with a new partner, get a tattoo or piercing, or have any medical procedures.

Rabies -- Rabies is present in bats in Jamaica. However, it is not a major risk to most travelers. CDC recommends rabies vaccine for only these groups:
    Travelers involved in outdoor and other activities in remote areas that put them at risk for bat bites (such as adventure travel and caving).
    People who will be working with or around bats (such as wildlife professionals and researchers).
Yellow Fever -- There is no risk of yellow fever in Jamaica. The government of Jamaica requires proof of yellow fever vaccination only if you are arriving from a country with risk of yellow fever. This does not include the US.

end ribbon



Quote of the Day:
“I have found out that there ain't no surer way to find out whether you like people or hate them than to travel with them.”

Featured Articles

Travelers' Health: Zika Virus in the Caribbean

Puerto Rico Declares Zika Outbreak Over, CDC Maintains Travel Warning

Updates on Trekking in Nepal and Nepal Travel Information

Venezuela: Updates on Major Border Crossing Points

How Can Travelers Prevent Measles in the Philippines?


Home About Us Terms of Use Privacy Pledge


Website Design & Web Content Copyright © 2018 Sunburst Worldwide Enterprises. All Rights Reserved. Warning: All of the pages on this online magazine are the intellectual property of Sunburst Worldwide Enterprises and are protected under U.S. and International copyright laws. Reproduction by any means or for any purpose is not allowed without the express written permission of the copyright owner. Plagiarism is a theft.
InternationalRiskManagement.com is an online publication of Sunburst Worldwide Enterprises. By using this site, you agree to our Terms and Conditions of Use.